Posted by: meredithbuchanan | May 13, 2010

Project Ignite

My grade six class is in the middle of a unit on Speeches. I decided to adopt the “Ignite” format and modify it to work for our class. Ignite’s slogan is “Enlighten us, but make it quick.” In a typical Ignite talk, the speaker would have exactly 5 minutes to speak, and 20 slides that automatically advance every 15 seconds. You can check it out at  http://igniteshow.com/.

For our purposes, students will have exactly 2 minutes, and 10 slides that automatically advance every 12 seconds. The task of finding images that support your message, combined with the challenge of speaking within the correct time frame, has my class of grade six students really engaged in the work. The students were able to choose whatever topic interested them most and whether they were going to take a persuasive or informative approach. Some examples of speech topics they chose are Rosa Parks, Why You Shouldn’t Eat So Much Chocolate,  Bow Wow, Somalia: Don’t Judge a Book by its Covor, and What is in Medicine? I chose to model this format for my students using a speech I wrote on Helen Keller. Click on the video to view it yourself!

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Responses

  1. Great work! I used the “pecha kutcha” model of presentations with my undergraduate students this term, for similar reasons you’ve adopted the “Ignite” format. This was one of the best examples from one of my students. Pecha Kutcha is 20 slides with 20 seconds per slide (20×20) and that makes for 6 min 40 sec presos.

    • Thanks! I checked out the “pecha kutcha” model. Your student created some fantastic work! I really enjoyed learning about it through this format.

  2. Well done!
    The nice thing about using the Ignite model is that you can now go to some of the Ignite presentations and use them as examples:
    What was good about this?… What wasn’t?
    Did the slides add to or distract from the presentation? Etc.
    But more than anything, I think students appreciate having their teacher model for them what they are expected to do… this goes so far beyond the ‘old’ adage of “Do what I say, not what I do” that really is ‘old’!
    Great job!
    Dave.


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